Hunger, Inequality and the Birth of Oxfam

This post by Oxfam’s Max Lawson first appeared on its Equals blog. I’ll be summarizing our new paper on the East Africa hunger crisis tomorrow. The other day I was speaking to Nellie, an old friend and primary school teacher in Malawi, about the rapidly rising prices: ‘Prices have risen, just since last month.  Imagine […]

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The UK’s new Development Strategy shows it’s in the midst of an identity crisis

Guest post by Sam Nadel, Oxfam GB’s Head of Government Relations You might remember Duncan’s ‘rant’ (his word) a few weeks ago about the Shameful Implosion of UK Aid, with the Government “hacking away at aid lifelines in order to hit the targets for cuts, shovelling money out the door to other government departments, dumping […]

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Links I Liked

We start with Russian wreckage: Any good explanations for why a tumble dryer was to be seen in the remains of this Russian helicopter in Ukraine? Someone actually made a David Attenborough style voiceover for this video of a destroyed Russian tank. Ht Christian Borys The changing way young people engage with climate change. ‘They […]

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Development Nutshell: round-up (18m) of FP2P posts, w/b 9th May

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How do we identify, support and/or build Champions in Development?

Nothing says ‘this needs a blog’ more than an over-long executive summary…. So here’s a summary and a few thoughts on ITAD’s report for the Gates Foundation on Champions: How to identify, support, and evaluate advocates for social change (full report 134 pages, Exec Sum 11 pages). I liked this because the aid sector is […]

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How Should Academics talk to Decision-Makers? Some Interesting New Research

I’m not a great fan of post-growth/degrowth debates – not enough emphasis on how to actually change policy for my liking (compared to the ‘I’m right, the planet is frying, why won’t you listen!’ school of advocacy). But a new paper by the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity caught my eye because it […]

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Theories of Change, the muddy middle, and what to do about assumptions

Spent a happy 90 minutes last week connecting with a bunch of Oxfam campaigners taking part in its excellent Campaigns and Advocacy Leadership Programme. They had asked to discuss something which already feels a bit last decade – Theories of Change (ToCs). My random thoughts (powerpoint below) were cautiously worded, because I have a growing […]

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Links I Liked

US and UK politics summed up in a couple of pics Happy 90th birthday Robert Chambers – what a hero. Here are some tributes to his (ongoing) work. I want to be like him when I grow up….. A Kenyan citizen phones up the IMF switchboard and asks to cancel Kenya’s loan. V funny, and […]

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What did I learn from trying to teach 50 senior aid people about influencing?

Ah the joys of the Chatham House rule – just got back from the second of our two pilot sessions on our new course on influencing, for senior UN, INGO and other leaders in countries from Turkmenistan to Zambia. Thanks to the CHR, I can only use their words if I don’t quote name, institution […]

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Political Gambles on Development

Stefan Dercon introduces his new book, published today in the UK (review to follow) I am starting to appreciate why historians rarely study contemporary history. Interpreting the present is always hard. I have felt this weight in my two core activities over the last two years: providing advice on global affairs and development issues pertaining […]

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