Which Citizens? Which Services? Unpacking Demand for Improved Health, Education, Roads, Water etc

Next up in the Twaweza series is this post from Ruth Carlitz of the University of Gothenburg. Please read and comment on the draft paper she summarizes here. Clean water. Paved roads. Quality education. Election campaigns in poor countries typically promise such things, yet the reality on the ground often falls short. So, what do […]

Read More »

How can researchers and activists influence African governments? Advice from an insider

One of the highlights of the Twaweza meeting was hearing from Togolani Mavura (left), the Private Secretary to former President Kikwete (in Tanzania, ex-presidents get a staff for life, not like in the UK where they have to hawk themselves round the after dinner speaking circuit). Togolani has worked across the  various policy levels  of the […]

Read More »

Can Evidence-based Activism still bring about change? The view from East Africa

Spent last week defrosting in Tanzania, at a fascinating conference that produced so many ideas for blogs that, even if all the promised pieces don’t materialize, we’re going to have to have a ‘Twaweza week’ on FP2P. Here’s the first instalment. I’m buzzing and sleep deprived after getting back from an intense two days in […]

Read More »

Links I Liked

Brexit stamps Huge crop experiment in China: Decade-long study involving 21 million smallholders shows how evidence-based approaches can improve food security and reduce GHG emissions. ‘As a result of the intervention, farmers were $12.2 billion better off.’ Cancer kills more people in developing countries than AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined. But, with Africa receiving only […]

Read More »

A Caring Economy: What role for government?

Anam Parvez (left), Oxfam’s Gender Justice Researcher and Lucia Rost, research consultant, introduce their new paper on gender equitable fiscal policies. In economics we are taught that there is no such thing as a free lunch. Even if something appears to be free, there are always costs – to you and/or society. What is striking is […]

Read More »

Challenging humanitarianism beyond gender as women and women as victims

Dorothea Hilhorst (right), Holly Porter (centre) and Rachel Gordon (left) introduce a highly topical new issue of the Disasters journal (open access for the duration of 2018). This post first appeared on the ISS blog. At the United Nations (UN) World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) in May 2016, ‘achieving greater gender equality and greater inclusivity’ was identified as one […]

Read More »

From sexual harassment to everyday sexism  – a feminist in Oxfam reflects on International Women’s Day

This guest post is by Nikki van der Gaag, Oxfam’s Director of Gender Justice and Women’s Rights This International Women’s Day feels different to any other for many working in the aid and humanitarian sector. Normally, it is a day where, like so many others, we celebrate women’s individual and collective achievements. But the reports […]

Read More »

How poor countries like Mongolia may be losing millions because of corporate tax practices and legal loopholes

Sarah McNeal is an Extractive Industries Policy Assistant at Oxfam America. This was first posted on its The Politics of Poverty blog When oil and mining companies extract resources in developing countries around the world, tracking the so-called “extractive industry” financial transactions can, at times, feel like a trip through Wonderland. Between the convoluted ownership […]

Read More »

I’m helping run a summer school on Adaptive Management. In Bologna. Interested?

This could be a lot of fun, I’m working with two of the smartest minds in Oxfam: Irene Guijt (head of research) and Claire Hutchings (head of Programme Quality) to design and deliver a one week summer school course on ‘Adaptive Management:  Working Effectively in the Complexity of International Development’. Between us we are going […]

Read More »

Links I Liked

I’m defrosting in Dar es Salaam next week, hanging with one of my all-time favourite NGOs – Twaweza. Ahead of International Women’s Day on Thursday, here’s the Glass Ceiling Index for OECD countries, ranking the best and worst countries for working women. Nordics win again. Britain at #25 – sigh. Science reporter Ed Yong spent two […]

Read More »