Some FP2P posts you might have missed – summer catch-up part 2

Another (final) round up of the posts you missed over the summer, if you were relying on your daily FP2P email to jog you into clicking through, or were just lounging in the sun. Here’s the main posts that went up from July until we fixed the email notifications a week or so ago Posts […]

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Someone just called their new book How Change Happens – here’s my totally impartial review

Finding out that someone’s called their new book ‘How Change Happens’, and that it’s about social movements, is disturbing – a bit like finding out that someone who looks just like you has assumed your identity and is chatting to your mates. But the new book by Leslie R Crutchfield ‘How Change Happens: Why some […]

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How can Civil Society respond to government crackdowns around the world? New Oxfam paper (and hello to Oxfam GB’s new boss)

Oxfam GB announced yesterday that Danny Sriskandarajah (right) will be its new boss. V exciting, and not just because he’s a mate. He comes to us from Civicus, the global alliance of civil society organizations. Here he is writing on this blog last year on the role of INGOs, if any, in defending civil society space. […]

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Nostalgia, fragility, age and management consultants: 4 Scandinavian conversations

A couple of weeks ago, I spent a day in Sigtuna, a lovely lakeside town just outside Stockholm, doing my usual blue sky/future of aid thing with big cheeses from the 5 Scandinavian protestant church agencies of the ACT Alliance. The ensuing conversations were full of lightbulb moments, including these four: Nostalgia as a political […]

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ICYMI: Highlights of this summer’s FP2P posts

About 6,000 of you have signed up for email notifications of new posts on FP2P, but the system crashed for some reason at the start of June and was only finally fixed last week. Now the notifications are back up, here’s an annotated guide to what you missed. 3 months-worth of posts is a hell […]

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So three years in, what do we know about the impact of the SDGs?

Next Tuesday I have to give a talk on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and I need your help. As you may recall, I was a massive SDG sceptic in the run up to their creation in 2015 (here’s a summary of previous rants, with links). Now I want to see if my scepticism needs […]

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Tanzania is about to outlaw fact checking: here’s why that’s a problem

Guest post from Aidan Eyakuze, Twaweza’s Executive Director Experts say it took just four minutes from beginning to end. First, some sensors failed. Then the pilots lost control of the plane, it stalled, went into freefall and smashed onto the surface of the Atlantic Ocean at a force 35 times greater than that of normal […]

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Should the UK (or other aid donors) ‘hold its nose’ and support an unjust end to civil wars?

Guest post from Anna Chernova, Oxfam’s Senior Humanitarian Policy Adviser There was some jubilation recently in South Sudan and amongst war-weary diasporas when the two leaders of the factions who have been driving the brutal conflict signed the Khartoum Agreement, which commits parties to a permanent ceasefire and lays the foundation for a peace deal […]

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Some Exciting Progress on Governance Diaries

One of the things I do on this blog is float random ideas for how the aid sector could do things differently. I’m under no illusions that anyone is actually listening. The best I can hope for is usually that a couple of people express mild interest in an idea, before it floats off into […]

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Links I Liked

Back to blogging after a fab holiday at the Edinburgh fringe. A wonderful statue in Berlin, entitled “Politicians Discussing Global Warming.” Oxfam America has come up with a ‘Best States to Work Index’ comparing labour conditions across US states. Washington, DC ranks first in the nation and neighbouring Virginia ranks last. ‘”There are grassroots leaders […]

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