“Donor-Researchers” and “Recipient-Researchers”: Bridging the Gap between Researchers from the Global North and Global South

Next up in this series of posts from the Bukavu workshops, we get into the nuts and bolts of the power differentials within the research ‘supply chain’, with Judith Nshobole. Introduction to the Bukavu series here. Search on ‘Bukavu’ for the other posts in the series. Original post here. Power imbalances between “donor-researchers” and “recipient-researchers” […]

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Epistemological Rupture, Detachment, and Decentring: Requirements When Doing Research “At Home”

Next up in this series of posts from the Bukavu workshops, Francine Mudunga discusses some messy issues that face many researchers. Original post here. A researcher is, first and foremost, a human being. As such, she is a product of her society. She is defined by a particular worldview, a specific collection of values and […]

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When You Become Pombe Yangu (“My Beer”): Dealing with the Financial Expectations of Research Participants

Next up in this series of posts from the Bukavu workshops, Jérémie Mapatano Byakumbwa  discusses some messy issues that face many researchers. Original post here. In my own experience as a researcher in eastern DRC, there have been numerous occasions on which I have had to deal with explicit demands for money (or for some […]

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Invisible Voices in the Production of Knowledge: Introducing the Bukavu series

There’s a lot of attention on this blog to localizing aid (increasing the power and resources in the hands of local organizations rather than white men in shorts), but what about localization of research? For the next few weeks, I am largely handing over the blog to the Bukavu Series, a set of blog posts […]

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Links I Liked

Some fine gallows humour from Naila Kabeer. ‘Clearly the Taliban have not caught up with the feminist critique of ‘manels’.’ Anyone care to add the David Hasselhof meme? How did Covid-19 affect women’s autonomy & access to healthcare in Pakistan? From 2020 to 2021, as a car crash. Ht Josh Warburton This is Nuts. ‘Europe […]

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Development Nutshell: round-up (17m) of FP2P posts, w/b 16th August

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How to Write About Afghanistan: A Style Guide for Western Journalists

I loved this blistering twitter thread by Justin Podur (@justinpodur) so much, I turned into a blogpost for the untwittered. ‘(In homage to Binyavanga Wainaina) First, the opening. All good articles about Afghanistan start with a few lines from a poem by British imperialist poet Rudyard Kipling. You know the one, “the women come out […]

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8 mistakes to avoid in reporting an INGO’s contributions to the SDGs

Guest post from Ximena Echeverria Magariños and Jay Goulden, of CARE International INGOs have for many years felt the need to communicate how many people their programs reach in a year, but the numbers of people our programs “touch” doesn’t tell us anything about the difference they make in people’s lives. Increasingly, INGOs are seeking […]

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What to Read on Afghanistan? Some of the best stuff I’ve read so far – please suggest more

On Monday, exasperated by the nature of the coverage of the fall of Kabul, I tweeted a request for links: ‘What to read on Afghanistan? Interested in power analysis/stakeholder mapping of domestic players, which Afghan groups support/oppose Taliban, informed speculation about what comes next.’ Here are some extracts from what came back (plus of course, […]

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Some Good ideas on Promoting locally-led development in the UK aid system

The British NGO network BOND recently published a report on ‘catalysing locally-led development in the UK aid system’, which summarizes a six month project involving dozens of people from different aid organizations. I have to confess that I started reading with low expectations – there are a lot of pious exhortations on localization, which all […]

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