Promoting anti-racist narratives in development sector research

The IIED’s Natalie Lartey explores common challenges in tackling racial bias in the storytelling that underpins international development research and identifies opportunities for change. Storytelling in the aid and development sectors has for many years been criticised for perpetuating racial stereotypes and bias. In the main, this critique has focused on public affairs content from big […]

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Links I Liked

How structural racism shows up in peacebuilding, from new Peace Direct report ht Shuna Keen How Not to End Mass Starvation. Alex de Waal argues it’s no use asking for money if you ignore conflict and war Lot of Aussie friends are VERY excited about Penny Wong, their new Foreign/Aid Minister ‘The UK has a […]

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Development Nutshell: round-up (22m) of FP2P posts, w/b 23rd May

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Why mothers are taking the fight for climate action to Lloyd’s of London

Guest post by Exfamer Maya Mailer In torrential rain, I clutched my 3 year-old daughter’s little hand. I was outside Lloyd’s of London, one of the world’s biggest insurers of fossil fuels, with a group of parents, toddlers and a giant paper mache oil drum filled with dying flowers. It was almost Father’s Day 2021. […]

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Billionaires made more in the 24 months of the pandemic than they did in 23 years. Oxfam on Davos

Max Lawson on Oxfam’s latest Davos broadside and his worries that his salary is about to get cut We are living through extraordinary times. Extraordinarily bad for the vast majority of humanity.  Extraordinarily good if you are one of the richest people in the world. Normally they meet in January at Davos, but that face-to-face […]

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An important new book on technology, power and development

Patching Development: Information Politics and Social Change in India by Rajesh Veeraraghavan is a wonderful and important book, a deep dive into the world’s largest social protection programme – India’s NREGA scheme – to explore the interaction between state reformers and citizen activists, as they work together, or sometimes against each other, to overcome the […]

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Links I Liked

Mainly visuals this week: Pfizer profits. Nuff said. Branko Milanovic on Amartya Sen’s “Home in the World: A Memoir” – one of those reviews that makes you want to buy the book (instead of being an alternative to buying it) glineq.blogspot.com/2022/05/the-ma… Leadership tips from James Timpson. Especially the last 3. Here’s everyone who has ever […]

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Development Nutshell: round-up (24m) of FP2P posts, w/b 16th May

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East Africa v Ukraine. Two tragedies; two very different responses

There’s sometimes a fine line between ‘what aboutery’ – unhelpfully distracting from one claim for public or policy attention by saying ‘yes, but what about X? – and a genuine exposure of double standards. But when it comes to East Africa right now, it’s not a fine line, but a gulf distinguishing the world’s feeble […]

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Hunger, Inequality and the Birth of Oxfam

This post by Oxfam’s Max Lawson first appeared on its Equals blog. I’ll be summarizing our new paper on the East Africa hunger crisis tomorrow. The other day I was speaking to Nellie, an old friend and primary school teacher in Malawi, about the rapidly rising prices: ‘Prices have risen, just since last month.  Imagine […]

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