Topic: Aid

How has Covid changed the picture on Aid/Development Jobs?

Guest post by Tom Kirk For the last few years, I’ve co-delivered an MA module on influencing, activism and campaigning with Duncan at the LSE. For the last lecture, we always ask students what two topics they would like us to delve into in more depth. They’ve plumped for everything from leadership and how INGOs […]

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Programming in Chaos. Why I think we’ve been getting it wrong.

I’ve been bouncing some ideas around with Irene Guijt on how aid agencies can/should work in what we call ‘fragile and conflict-affected settings’ (FCAS). This matters because FCAS are where a lot of the aid business (both donors and INGOs) will end up, as more stable countries grow their way out of aid dependence (and […]

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Is the UK diverting Covid vaccines from poorer countries?

Guest post by Rory Horner (University of Manchester) and Ken Shadlen (LSE) Various UK media reports have blamed lower than expected supply of the AstraZeneca vaccine from India for a slowing of the UK’s vaccination programme, especially delaying immunisation of the under-50s. Although five million doses of vaccines produced by the Serum Institute of India […]

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How a ‘public authority’ lens can help us understand NGOs and INGOs

This post by my LSE colleague Tom Kirk is part of a series exploring ‘public authority’ based on research at LSE’s Centre for Public Authority and International Development at the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa. It was first published on the Africa at LSE blog A ‘public authorities’ lens seeks to understand the full range of actors claiming power […]

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‘Do-it-yourself development’: the world of citizen aid and what to do about it

Guest post by Seb Rumsby As our world becomes increasingly globalised, there are now more and more chances for people from vastly unequal economic situations to meet and connect – be it through tourism, migration or social media. At the same time, we are witnessing a widespread disillusionment with so-called ‘experts’ and technocrats in the […]

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When throwing evidence and facts is not enough. How Change Happens in the Humanitarian System

Here’s a sentence you don’t often hear. I just read a really interesting conference report. Transforming Change: How Change Really Happens and What we can do about it, by Paul Knox Clarke, summarizes a big 2017 discussion on the drivers of change in the humanitarian system, as well as the blockers. I reported on it […]

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After Covid, what next for the world’s kids?

Guest post by UNICEF’s Laurence Chandy One salvation of the COVID-19 pandemic is that children have been largely spared from severe infections. Yet the broader effects of the crisis on the young have already caused untold harm and are now poised to reset the forces that have driven progress for the world’s children since the […]

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Words to sprinkle, camouflage and befuddle: Idle musings on the slipperiness of language

Words, words, words. In snowbound lockdown I process thousands of them every day, writing them, reading them, tweaking them. And spotting odd patterns, and layers of obfuscation and general slipperiness. Here are a few thoughts (I’m not doing standard devspeak rants here – plenty of those already on the blog), aided and abetted by crowdsourcing […]

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Seizing a window of opportunity: lessons from research on anti-corruption reform

Guest post by Florencia Guerzovich, Soledad Gattoni, and Dave Algoso Anyone working for change knows that timing matters. You can see your efforts stall and spin for years, before finally you break through. What made that possible? Sometimes it’s your persistence, wearing down opposition like water carving a canyon. But sometimes it’s a change that […]

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Why the Inequality Virus should be the talk of Davos this week

It’s Davos week again. Julie Seghers (Twitter @JulieSeghers) summarizes Oxfam’s new report. The 2021 Davos edition is pretty unusual. For the first time, the world’s rich and powerful aren’t flying their jets to the Swiss mountains, but are instead meeting online to chart a path out of a deadly pandemic and the worst economic recession […]

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