G20 curtain raisers; Will China integrate Africa?; using humour for healthcare reform; Congress and New York Post v climate change: links I liked

Michael Harvey at Global Dashboard .  ‘While 82% of the IMF’s newly loaned resources have gone to European area countries, just 1.6% have gone to countries in Africa.’ Ngaire Woods analyses the development response to the global meltdown since the April G20 summit in a paper for the European Parliament. Will Chinese investment provide the catalyst for East African integration? ‘The main argument against climate action probably won’t be the claim that global warming is a myth. It will, instead, be the argument that doing anything to limit global warming would destroy the economy.’ Paul Krugman prepares us for the Congressional climate change debate, which may surpass even the courtesy and intelligence of the healthcare reform discussions (my cheap sarcasm, not his). He looks at the numbers and concludes ‘the campaign against saving the planet rests mainly on lies’.protest funny Sticking with healthcare reform, how to subvert a demo with humour. From the Huffington Post’s collection of funniest protest signs of 2009. Focus on the tall guy in the middle……. (h/t Alex Evans) And finally, a fun video on a spoof climate change issue of the New York Post – watch out for the enraged NYP executive scoring a spectacular own goal half way through “SPECIAL EDITION” NEW YORK POST from The Yes Men on Vimeo.]]>

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Comments

3 Responses to “G20 curtain raisers; Will China integrate Africa?; using humour for healthcare reform; Congress and New York Post v climate change: links I liked”
  1. Alex

    With so many hot topics in Congress right now, it’s hard to believe that anything will get done. The health-care saga has become a joke. Although I do enjoy political humor, it’s hard to laugh when people are losing insurance everyday, and to reference the VMAs once again, we “allow people to die on the street.” Health-care and climate change are two of these most pressing issues, so naturally we will be waiting years for any sort of relief.