G20 gloom; fragile states are difficult; private sector positives; climate change progress (and comedy); subeditor sabotage at the Guardian; unpacking inequality: links I liked

this week’s G20 summit in Cannes. Fragile state slot: How is DFID going to focus its cash on fragile and conflict affected states and have zero tolerance on fraud and corruption? (Madeleine Bunting pointed out the same contradiction 6 months ago.) And why does DFID give such huge chunks of money to the World Bank and other multilaterals? The UK Parliamentary Accounts Committee asks some tough questions. ‘I am increasingly getting the feeling that NGOs working in fragile states are just setting themselves up to under-perform if not actually fail’, Makarand Sahasrabuddhe, who works for Oxfam in East Africa, does some serious agonising. Private Sector good news slot: Entergy and Starbucks, together with Levi Strauss & Company, Calvert Investments, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, and Swiss Re, announce a new partnership to tackle growing climate challenges to their businesses. ‘Africa’s biggest gold miner AngloGold Ashanti has started paying 30 percent corporate tax to the Tanzanian government this year for its Geita mine, in line with the east African country’s new mining policy. This is the first time that the mine has started paying corporate tax in Tanzania since it began commercial gold production in August 2000.’ Whatever next? [h/t Beyond Aid] Two posts (on a Green Growth conference and a Chatham House roundup event) from Simon Maxwell on the state of the climate change debate try to counteract the gloom. Progress is being made on areas like renewables, but is being driven by the search for growth and jobs, not by the UN process. And some depressing-but-funny climate change comedy c/o the UN. And who’s the dastardly subeditor at the Guardian who seems determined to deter readers from ever clicking on their development posts? Evidence for the prosecution: ‘Report Urges Governments to Act’ has to be one of the most unenticing headlines ever. Close runner up ‘World Bank must match rhetoric with funding’. Pity the poor journalists who write the (presumably unread) articles. Linked here to redress the damage a bit. Finally, ‘Spirit Level’ author Richard Wilkinson sets out his thesis that inequality harms societies in this nice 16 minute TED talk ]]>

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Comments

One Response to “G20 gloom; fragile states are difficult; private sector positives; climate change progress (and comedy); subeditor sabotage at the Guardian; unpacking inequality: links I liked”
  1. But seriously, WTF is the G20?
    The presidential system is high on testosterone, but in general low on results adn sustainability. For politicians in general, a press release is a result.
    Their legitimacy of this club is seriously in doubt, meanwhile it deligitimizes other clubs with real legitimacy. In the end the decisions that will be taken are those one is prepared to take, whatever the place you meet.