Migration and disability as development issues; Mogadishu's first tourist; Latin American attitudes; the Hans Rosling show; climate change makes you cry: links I liked

migration. But he probably wasn’t thinking of Somalia’s first tourist [h/t wronging rights]).  More on disability, this time from the UN: ‘Over 650 million people in the world have a disability; they make up approximately 10% of the world’s population and are the world’s largest minority.’  Feels like this one is issue is going to get more prominent over the coming years Latinobarometro crime v jobsWhat are Latin Americans thinking? The always illuminating annual Latinobarometro regional opinion poll in the Economist. Big shift this year is rising fear of crime – now seen as a bigger problem than jobs across the region (see graph) Also from the Economist, the inexorable rise of Hans Rosling continues with this profile. If you missed his BBC programme on ‘the joy of stats’, you can watch it online til Tuesday night (when for some reason, the BBC takes it down). Climate change is enough to make you cry, especially if you are in charge of the negotiations to save the world. After Yvo de Boer’s much publicised weepie in Bali, his successor, Costa Rican Christiana Figueres, breaks down as soon as she starts talking to a bunch of activists in Cancun (and she was still in week one….). [h/t Alex Evans] ]]>

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Comments

3 Responses to “Migration and disability as development issues; Mogadishu's first tourist; Latin American attitudes; the Hans Rosling show; climate change makes you cry: links I liked”
  1. Nicholas Colloff

    I believe the BBC take ‘it’ and indeed all programmes on iplayer down after 7 days because otherwise they would have to make additional payments under ‘repeat fee’ arrangements.

  2. Nicholas Colloff

    On a more significant point: namely, migration. One of the difficulties of ’embracing’ it from a poverty perspective is that it can be seen as a mechanism to supress ‘wages’ in recipient countries; thus, it contributes to the relative poverty of low paid workers in the migrant country.
    Leaving aside the drivers of migration in country of origin, many of which are ‘unjust’: from the historical record the clearances in Scotland come to mind or famine in Ireland.